I felt him get shot in the back’: First victim identified in Las Vegas shooting

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When the bullets started raining down on the crowd at a Las Vegas country music festival on Sunday, Sonny Melton’s first reaction was to protect his wife.

“He saved my life,” Heather Melton said. “He grabbed me from behind and started running when I felt him get shot in the back.”

Sonny Melton, 29, a registered nurse from Tennessee, was soon pronounced dead, one of at least 58 people who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas on Sunday night.

Melton lived in Big Sandy, Tenn., and was a registered nurse at Henry County Medical Center in Paris, Tenn. Heather Melton is an orthopaedic surgeon there, and officials from the center said they will provide counselors to staff who are struggling to deal with this “horrible incident.”

“The thoughts and prayers of the entire HCMC family are with Sonny and Heather’s families,” the center’s CEO, Thomas Gee, said in a statement.

The couple married in June 2016, according to the wedding website The Knot.

“We were the couple that never should have met, fallen in love or had a future together….but life is funny and we believe God brought us together as soul mates,” read their wedding page. “We have shared amazing times together and nearly unbearable heartaches but through it all we have grown stronger in our love for each other and our families.”

On Monday, Heather Gulish Melton said she was not yet ready to open up about what she went through.

“I want everyone to know what a kind hearted loving man he was but at this point I can barely breathe,” she wrote to USA TODAY.

Dozens of families are going through their own version of agony as Las Vegas officials process the massive crime scene and notify next of kin. Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said Monday that at least 58 people were dead and another 515 injured.

“It’s a long, laborious process to identify the victims and reunite them with family members to advise them of their situation,” Lombardo said.

Here is a look at some of the victims.

Sonny Melton, 29, Tennessee

Melton lived in Big Sandy, Tenn., and was a registered nurse at Henry County Medical Center in Paris, Tenn. Heather Melton, his wife, is an orthopaedic surgeon there, and officials from the center said they will provide counselors to staff who are struggling to deal with this “horrible incident.”

“The thoughts and prayers of the entire HCMC family are with Sonny and Heather’s families,” the center’s CEO, Thomas Gee, said in a statement.

The couple married in June 2016, according to the wedding website The Knot.

“We were the couple that never should have met, fallen in love or had a future together….but life is funny and we believe God brought us together as soul mates,” read their wedding page. “We have shared amazing times together and nearly unbearable heartaches but through it all we have grown stronger in our love for each other and our families.”

On Monday, Heather Gulish Melton said she was not yet ready to open up about what she went through.

“I want everyone to know what a kind hearted loving man he was but at this point I can barely breathe,” she wrote to USA TODAY.

Jordan McIldoon, 23, British Columbia, Canada

McIldoon was attending the country music festival with his girlfriend when he was shot and killed. His parents, Al and Angela McIldoon, told CBC News that he was scheduled to return home Monday night.

“We only had one child,” they told the Canadian broadcast network. “We just don’t know what to do.”

They said McIldoon was a heavy-duty mechanic apprentice and was preparing to start trade school in in the Okanagan region of the Canadian province directly north of Washington state. They couple said they were working through the Canadian consulate to figure out the next steps.

Dozens of families are going through their own version of agony as Las Vegas officials process the massive crime scene and notify next of kin. Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said Monday that at least 58 people were dead and another 515 injured.

“It’s a long, laborious process to identify the victims and reunite them with family members to advise them of their situation,” Lombardo said.

H/T usatoday

 

 

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